Overview of Board Programs

Note that the Board accounts for staff resources in PY's, or "Person Years", which represent a single full-time employee of the Regional Board

Permitting Programs

NPDES Program


Overview of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Program

The Clean Water Act’s NPDES program is a federal program that USEPA has delegated to the State of California. This program protects beneficial uses by regulating point source discharges of pollutants to surface waters. Point sources are discrete conveyances, such as pipes, and include wastewater treatment facilities, fish hatcheries, and industrial facilities. “Major” or “minor” NPDES permits are issued to individual facilities depending on a facility’s threat to water quality (e.g., the flow rate and/or the threat and complexity of the discharge). General NPDES permits can regulate numerous facilities with similar types of discharges. NPDES permits are updated every five years.

Program Goals

  • Regulate all point source discharges to waters of the United States to ensure protection of beneficial uses;
  • Permits are renewed every five years; and
  • Where appropriate, the cost of compliance is considered when developing permit conditions.

Resources

Staff resources for the NPDES Program (25.7 PY) is allocated for permitting (15.4 PYs), compliance/enforcement (7.8 PYs), and management/support (2.5 PYs).

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • 17 permits renewed, 14 permits rescinded, and 6 individual permits converted to coverage under general orders.
  • Permitting Efficiencies – Board staff began implementing a mid-permit review process for NPDES facilities with the goal of identifying issues early so more complete information will be available to make sound permitting decisions by the time the permit renewal is considered by the Board.
  • Data Quality Assurance – The USEPA’s Sufficiently Sensitive Methods Rule was fully implemented in FY 19/20. Board staff worked with discharger groups and commercial laboratory organizations to inform them of the new data requirements to ensure successful implementation.
  • Web Document Accessibility – Board staff developed web accessible document templates so documents posted on the web are accessible for people with disabilities.

Priorities 20/21

  • Permitting Efficiencies, Quality, and Consistency – Continue developing and implementing streamlining measures to reduce time needed to develop permits and improve permit consistency and quality.
  • Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long-Term Sustainability (CV-SALTS) Implementation – Work with permittees to implement the new salinity and nitrate requirements.
  • Data Quality Assurance – Maintain a focus on obtaining quality data for permitting decisions. Staff to perform mid-permit reviews to identify data issues early, and request permittees to resolve data quality issues prior to submitting permit renewal applications.
  • Permit Targets: 9 Major Permit Renewals, 12 Minor Permit Renewals

Waste Discharge to Land Program


Overview of the Waste Discharge to Land Program

The Waste Discharge to Land Program primarily regulates waste discharges that may affect groundwater quality. The Program includes staff from all three offices and is the Board’s oldest state water quality control program, covering a wide variety of discharges. In the Central Valley, the Program regulates wastewater (sewage) treatment facilities, food processing industries (including wineries), wastewater recycling, sand and gravel mines, and other industries that discharge non-hazardous wastes. The Program currently regulates over 1,400 facilities.

Program Goals

The Waste Discharge to Land Program’s core activities include expediting the completion of new or revised individual waste discharge requirements (WDRs), the identification and enrollment of dischargers under existing general orders or waivers, and the development additional general orders to regulate classes of dischargers in a consistent manner.

The Waste Discharge to Land Program will be implementing the CV SALTS requirements. These tasks will include stakeholder outreach and the distribution of notices to comply, triggering actions by dischargers regulated by our Program. This Program is also responsible for implementing the State Water Board’s Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Policy (OWTS Policy).

Resources

There currently are 23 PYs in the Program. About 15.26 PYs are dedicated to permitting, about 7 PYs are dedicated to Compliance and Enforcement for facilities regulated by this program, and the remaining fractional PYs assist with the Oilfield Program and certain cleanup sites.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • 18 individual WDRs developed and issued by the Board
  • 85 discharges enrolled under existing General Orders or Waivers
  • 30 pre-permitting site inspections
  • Reviewed numerous technical reports submitted by dischargers seeking to modify their discharges or that have upgraded their facilities
  • Issued several monitoring and reporting programs and 13260/13267 letters requesting Reports of Waste Discharge from dischargers that were not currently being regulated by the Board

Priorities 20/21

  • Incorporate CV-SALTS language into permits and address CV-SALTS requirements
  • Continue Lean 6 Sigma implementation and tracking
  • Develop new region-wide general orders to reduce backlog
    • Large domestic WWTF (Redding)
    • Nut drying and hulling (Sacramento)
    • Food processors (Fresno)
  • GeoTracker deployment in the Program
  • Provide input on state-wide general orders being developed by the State Water Board

Water Quality Certification Program


Overview of the Water Quality Certifications Program

The Water Quality Certification program regulates the removal or placement of materials in wetlands and waterways in the State. Examples of such projects include navigational dredging, flood control channelization, levee construction, channel clearing, fill of wetlands for development, bridge piers, docks, etc. These types of projects generally require a federal permit from the US Army Corps of Engineers, and the federal Clean Water Act requires that the State issue a companion Water Quality Certification that contains requirements to ensure that the project will meet State water quality requirements. The Water Quality Certifications Program also implements the State Water Board’s new Dredge/Fill Procedures.

Program Goals

The Water Quality Certifications Program places emphasis on ensuring that wetlands, riparian areas, and headwaters are protected since these waterbodies have high resource value, are vulnerable to filling, and are not systematically protected by other programs. The program is involved with protection of special-status species and regulation of hydromodification impacts. The program implements the State and Federal Wetlands “No Net Loss” Policies, which seek to avoid, reduce, and mitigate impacts. The program seeks to first avoid project impacts, and then minimize and compensate for unavoidable impacts.

Resources

The Central Valley Water Board has 12.15 PYs to implement the program.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Reviewed applications for 336 projects, issued 321 actions, and conducted 18 inspections.
  • Participated on the Inter-Agency Review Team for the the Central Valley In-Lieu Fee Program.
  • Adopted and issued elements to implement the South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan. Issued initial elements to implement the Placer County Habitat Conservation Plan.
  • Participated on a multi-agency transportation task force implementing AB1282 to streamline permitting for Caltrans projects.
  • Progressed on creating a general permit to regulate maintenance dredging activities.
  • Trained program staff and began implementation of State Water Board’s new Dredge/Fill Procedures.

Priorities 20/21

  • Implement the new Dredge/Fill Procedures adopted by the State Water Board.
  • Review applications, issue certification actions, and conduct targeted inspections on a projected 300 projects.
  • Continue implementation of the South Sacramento Habitat Conservation Plan, and complete elements for implementation of the Placer County Habitat Conservation Plan.
  • Adopt a new general order for maintenance dredging.
  • Continue to participate on a multi-agency transportation task force implementing AB1282 to streamline permitting for Caltrans projects.
  • Continue to participate in development of a general order for utility vegetation management and implementation of utility wildfire management plans under SB 901.

Storm Water Program


Overview of the Storm Water Program

The Storm Water Program regulates the discharge of pollutants in storm water to waters of the U.S. The program is divided into three main areas of activity: construction (including Caltrans projects), industrial, and municipal. The permits require implementation of Best Management Practices (BMPs) and other program elements and controls to minimize the discharge of pollutants, and require visual and chemical monitoring. Board staff review monitoring and other program reports, conduct compliance inspections and audits, and conduct enforcement activities as needed.

Program Goals

The goal of the Storm Water Program is to prevent discharges of pollutants in storm water and non-storm water from running off of construction, industrial, and municipal areas and affecting beneficial uses in surface waters. Pollutants frequently associated with storm water discharges include sediment, petroleum products, pesticides/herbicides, metals, bacteria, trash and other debris. Staff review individual projects, make site-specific recommendations, and ensure compliance with pertinent regulations and policies through inspections and enforcement. Staff pursue water quality protection at construction and industrial sites through a strong field presence, review of reports, and analysis of monitoring data. Staff pursue water quality protection associated with MS4 discharges by ensuring approved management plans are being implemented and are effective.

Resources

The Central Valley Water Board has 11.75 PYs to implement the program.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Maintained a strong field presence and conducted 401 Construction inspections, 210 Industrial inspections, and 26 Municipal inspections/audits.
  • Worked with MS4 permittees on development of Storm Water Management Plan elements.
  • Participated in multi-agency trash cleanups in urban waterways.
  • Supported implementation of sediment and erosion control measures and water quality monitoring and assessment in past wildfire areas.
  • Coordinated with the Planning section on implementation of the Pyrethroids Control Program.

Priorities 20/21

  • Maintain a strong field presence and conduct at least 385 Construction inspections, 195 Industrial inspections, and increase numbers of Municipal inspections/audits.
  • Continue working with MS4 permittees on development, and review and approval of Storm Water Management Plan elements.
  • Begin work for renewal of the Regionwide Municipal General Permit.
  • Review and approve plans for capture of municipal trash, and support development of strategies to promote watershed-level trash cleanups.
  • Support implementation of the Pyrethroids Control Program by reviewing and approving monitoring plans and management plans.

Planning, Monitoring and Assessment

Basin Planning Program


Overview of the Basin Planning Program

Water Quality Control Plans, or Basin Plans, provide the foundation for all the Board’s regulatory actions. Basin Plans identify beneficial uses of surface and ground waters, water quality objectives to protect those uses, implementation actions to achieve objectives, and monitoring and surveillance programs to ensure implementation actions are effective. There are two Basin Plans for the Central Valley Region, one for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River Basins, and one for the Tulare Lake Basin.

Program Goals

The goals of the Planning Program are to establish regulatory policies, frameworks and programs that will preserve and enhance water quality and protect beneficial uses. Ultimately, many Planning Program projects result in amendments to the Basin Plans that provide the foundation for all the Board’s regulatory actions. Furthermore, the Triennial Review, managed under the Board’s Planning Program, is a public process conducted every three years to ensure that the Basin Plans address public concerns and continue to be effective at meeting program goals.

Resources

The resources for this program are 8 PYs, 5 PYs of which are allocated to CV-SALTS. (Resources for the TMDL Program and the Delta Program are accounted separately.)

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Provided support for CV-SALTS Implementation.
  • Implemented new Triennial Review priority projects including Tribal Beneficial Use Designations, Pit River Evaluation, and Regional Temperature Criteria Development.
  • Continued to work with State Water Board staff to develop Biostimulatory Biointegrity Policy development for wadeable streams and provide updates to Central Valley Water Board staff and management.
  • Streamlined cyanobacteria harmful algal bloom event response and implemented new protocols.
  • Continued Tribal coordination throughout the Agency.

Priorities 20/21

  • Continue to allocate resources to coordinate the implementation of the CV-SALTS Program.
  • Continue implementation of prioritized new Triennial Review projects including Tribal Beneficial Uses, Regional Temperature Criteria Development, and the Pit River Evaluation.
  • Develop basin plan amendments to address beneficial use de-designations in areas where natural conditions prevent attainment of beneficial uses.
  • Continue participation in State Water Board development of the Biostimulatory Biointegrity Policy and develop a eutrophication workplan to coordinate programs across the Agency.
  • Add Tribal Beneficial Uses definitions to the Basin Plans.
  • Begin the 2021 Triennial Review process.
  • Conduct beneficial use assessment for harmful algal blooms.

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDL) Program


Overview of the TMDL Program

Clean Water Act section 303(d) requires States to develop a list of surface water bodies that do not meet water quality standards (called the 303(d) list), and to establish pollutant load reduction targets (total maximum daily loads, or TMDLs) or equivalent alternative control programs necessary to attain water quality standards. TMDLs establish numeric targets to attain applicable water quality standards, establishes the waterbody's maximum allowable pollutant load consistent with those targets, and allocates the allowable load among the pollutant sources. TMDLs must include an implementation plan to achieve the pollutant load reductions.

Program Goals

The goal of the TMDL program is to protect and restore surface waters through water quality assessments to identify impairments. This goal is accomplished through the development and implementation of TMDLs and control programs that address 303(d) impairment listings. The program has focused on the highest priority pollutants and stressors including pesticides, mercury, salt, selenium, low dissolved oxygen and nutrients. The TMDL program addresses and updates 303(d) listings, develops programs that prevent potential future 303(d) listings and address current listings, and documents when existing control programs preclude the need for TMDLs.

Resources

The TMDL Program has 10 PYs allocated that include 2.5 PYs for Integrated Report, and 3.4 PYs and 1.4 PYs for Mercury and Pesticide TMDLs, respectively.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Initiated region-wide water quality assessment for the 2020 Integrated Report, updated the 303(d) list of impaired water bodies, and completed 2018 Integrated Report.
  • Continued implementation of existing priority TMDL and related control programs including Pyrethroids in the Central Valley, Mercury in the Delta, low Dissolved Oxygen and Salt and Boron TMDLs in the San Joaquin River.
  • Continued Mercury Exposure Reduction Program (MERP) outreach and education and completed final report on program effectiveness evaluation.
  • Completed review and approval of Phase 1 control study reports for the Delta Methylmercury TMDL reconsideration and began the updated data analysis.
  • Continued implementation of the Pyrethroid TMDL and provided requirements and monitoring guidance to stakeholders.

Priorities 20/21

  • Continued implementation of existing priority TMDL and related control program projects including those for Pyrethroids in the Central Valley, Mercury in the Delta, low Dissolved Oxygen and Salt and Boron TMDLs in the San Joaquin River.
  • Continue to support the adoption of the 2018 Integrated Report, develop 2020 Integrated Report, and update the 303(d) list of impaired waterbodies.
  • Continue revision of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta Methylmercury TMDL including completion of the linkage and source allocation analysis with new data and begin stakeholder public meetings.
  • Review management and mitigation plans submitted to the Board as part of the requirements of the Pyrethroid Pesticide TMDL.
  • Present review of the Diazinon and Chlorpyrifos Control Program reconsideration to the Board.

The Delta Program


Overview of the Delta Program

The objectives of the Delta Program are to improve and protect water quality in the Sacramento San Joaquin River Delta through Central Valley Water Board actions and coordination with other agencies. Those efforts include the development and implementation of total maximum daily load control programs and assessments of data relative to water quality objectives. Actions are guided by the Central Valley Water Board’s 2014 Delta Strategic Work Plan and the Delta Nutrient Research Plan

The Delta Program includes the Delta Regional Monitoring Program, a stakeholder-directed program formed to collect and evaluate data to improve understanding of Delta water quality issues.

Program Goals

  • Coordinate with State and San Francisco Bay Water Boards regarding planning and permits affecting the Delta;
  • Work with other agencies and entities that have jurisdiction over various actions in the Delta to ensure improvement and protection of Delta water quality;
  • Manage the Delta Regional Monitoring Program, including communication of management needs, participation on program committees and development and implementation of monitoring studies;
  • Implement monitoring, research, and assessments to determine water quality conditions and impacts, including pesticides, metals, and eutrophication; and apply understanding of current status to forecast future conditions and impacts.
  • Implement the 2014 Delta Strategic Work Plan

Resources

There are 3.4 PYs allocated to the Delta Program, mostly allocated to the Delta Regional Monitoring Program and the Delta Nutrient Research Plan.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Delta Nutrient Research Plan
    • Compile data and began development of mass balance for phosphorous and nitrogen.
    • Investigated nutrients and potential for harmful algal bloom management in Discovery Bay.
    • Secured funds for monitoring and research to implement Nutrient Research Plan.
    • Coordinated with State-wide Eutrophication Amendments and San Francisco Bay nutrient management programs.
  • Delta Regional Monitoring Program (RMP)
    • Managed program, developed monitoring plans for mercury, nutrients, contaminants of emerging concern, and pesticides.
    • Continued implementation of mercury and nutrient monitoring projects and data and report reviews.
    • Continued stratified probabilistic pesticides and toxicity monitoring in 2 Delta subregions and reviewed data report.
    • Assessed program governance and formed subcommittee to determine new program structure based on current program needs.

Priorities 20/21

  • Continue to manage the Delta Regional Monitoring Program
  • Begin monitoring contaminants of emerging concern.
  • Work with stakeholders to develop new Delta RMP governance structure.
  • Continue to implement the Delta Nutrient Research Plan, including new studies on nutrients, harmful algal blooms (HAB) and HAB toxins.
  • Complete the mass balance study on phosphorus and nitrogen.

CV-SALTS Program


Overview of the CV-SALTS Programs

The Central Valley Salinity Alternatives for Long-Term Sustainability (CV-SALTS) initiative is a stakeholder-driven effort tasked with developing an environmentally and economically sustainable regulatory framework to address the legacy and ongoing salt and nitrate accumulation that threatens the region’s water supplies. Their recommendations served as the foundation of a Central Valley-wide Salt and Nitrate Control Program Basin Plan Amendment in 2018. Groundwater components of the amendment became effective after Office of Administrative Law approval in January 2020 and implementation of the new nitrate regulations began in May 2020. Approval by USEPA for surface water salinity components is expected in Summer 2020.

Program Goals

The overarching management goals and priorities of the Salt and Nitrate Control Program are:

  • Ensure safe drinking water supply
  • Reduce salt and nitrate loading so that ongoing discharges neither threaten to degrade high quality waters nor cause or contribute to exceedances of water quality objectives
  • Implement long-term, managed restoration of impaired water bodies

To meet these prioritized goals, the Salt and Nitrate Control Program has been phased with specific implementation activities required for salt and another set of implementation activities required for nitrate. Both implementation approaches provide permittees the option to select their means of compliance: either through a conservative permitting approach focused on individual source control or through an alternative coordinated, multi-discharger management approach.

Resources

In 20/21, the CV-SALTS program has 4.85 PYs shared between 6 staff in the Rancho Cordova office and 2 staff in the Fresno office.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • The Salt and Nitrate Control Program Basin Plan Amendment was adopted by the State Water Board in October 2019 and the Office of Administrative Law in January 2020.
  • Notice to Comply letters for the Nitrate Control Program were mailed out to Priority 1 groundwater dischargers in May 2020.
  • Staff provided ongoing implementation and planning support to Central Valley Water Board program managers and coordinated with State Water Board stakeholders.
  • Staff participated in CV-SALTS Executive Committee meetings, Public Education and Outreach meetings, Management Zone Team meetings and public workshops.
  • Staff managed and participated in grants for two Nitrate Control Program Early Implementation Management Zones and the Salt Control Program’s Prioritization and Optimization (P&O) Study Workplan.

Priorities 20/21

  • The State Water Board’s approval of the Salt and Nitrate Control Program was conditional on the Central Valley Water Board adopting an additional Basin Plan Amendment by January 2021 that includes targeted revisions to several aspects of the program’s longer-term implementation plan. Staff will support efforts to bring the new amendment to a Central Valley Water Board hearing by the end of 2020.
  • Staff will continue to support program implementation activities which include Notice to Comply mailouts for the Salt Control Program, document submittal tracking and review, permit updates and enforcement actions as required by the program.
  • Staff will continue to coordinate and participate with stakeholder activities, like public workshops, educational outreach and ongoing CV-SALTS team meetings.

Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP)


Overview of the SWAMP Program

The California Surface Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP) was created to fulfill the legislative mandate for a unifying program that would coordinate all surface water quality monitoring conducted by the State and Regional Water Boards. The SWAMP program conducts water quality monitoring directly and through collaborative partnerships, and provides numerous reports, fact sheets and tools, all designed to support water resource management in California. SWAMP monitoring projects assess overall water quality status and trends, identify water quality problems and potential sources, and evaluate program effectiveness.

Program Goals

The Central Valley Water Board has four overarching goals for its SWAMP efforts; 1) Evaluate ambient water quality, beneficial use protection, and potential sources of impairment; 2) Evaluate effectiveness of the Water Board water quality improvement policies; 3) Coordinate internal and external monitoring efforts to leverage limited resources, and; 4) Ensure timely availability of monitoring results.

Resources

In 20/21, the SWAMP program has 4 PYs shared between 7 staff in the Rancho Cordova office, 1 staff in the Redding office, and 3 staff in the Fresno office.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Initiated bacteria source identification monitoring in the Lower American River.
  • Conducted summer recreational beneficial use assessments in the Stockton Urban Waterways and the Upper San Joaquin River watershed.
  • Continued to support toxicity monitoring in the Delta and nutrient monitoring for the Delta Nutrient Research Plan.
  • Conducted sediment toxicity sampling in the Camp Fire area to evaluate potential long-term impacts to the environment.
  • Supported a study that will establish sentinel non-perennial stream sites in the Sierra Nevada to assess reference conditions and evaluate how varying flow conditions affect biology and water quality.
  • Continued to support initial Harmful Algal Bloom response monitoring.
  • Restarted the long-term coordinated trend monitoring project in the Sacramento River Watershed in collaboration with the Department of Water Resources.

Priorities 20/21

  • Continue bacteria source identification monitoring in the Lower American River.
  • Conduct summer recreational beneficial use assessments in the Delta, the Upper San Joaquin River watershed and the Lower Kings River watershed. Update online maps and data portals weekly for the public.
  • Provide lab contract support for Delta Regional Monitoring Program efforts.
  • Implement the Central Valley Water Board’s Harmful Algal Bloom response protocol.
  • Continue to support the long-term coordinated trend monitoring project in the Sacramento River Watershed.
  • Submit surface water quality data to the California Environmental Data Exchange Network (CEDEN). Water quality data that support programs associated with the Salt and Nitrate Control Program, Nutrient Management, Basin Planning, or the 303(d)/305(b) Integrated Report are of a high priority.

Nonpoint Source Program


Overview of the Nonpoint Source Program

Nonpoint source pollution is the leading cause of water quality impairments in California. The primary nonpoint sources in the Central Valley include runoff and percolation from land use activities related to agriculture, timber harvests, cannabis cultivation, abandoned mines, recreation, and urban and rural development.

Program Goals

The goal of the Central Valley Nonpoint Source Program (NPS Program) is to restore waters impacted by NPS pollution and protect unimpaired water bodies by assessing problem sources and implementing management programs.

The Central Valley NPS Program implements the statewide California Nonpoint Source Program Implementation Plan for 2014-2020 (Six-Year Implementation Plan), which was approved by US EPA in August 2015. The purpose of this plan is to improve the State’s ability to effectively manage NPS pollution and conform to the requirements of the federal Clean Water Act and, where applicable, the federal Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments. The Six-Year Implementation Plan focuses on impaired water bodies and water bodies that face immediate water quality threats from new and expanding development.

Resources

NPS Program activities funded by federal 319(h) resources are implemented by six different units spread across all three offices in the Region. For FY20/21, 3.3 PYs are allocated amongst nine staff positions (PCA 281). No staff position is fully funded by the federal 319(h) resources; PYs allocations per person range from 0.2 PYs to 0.7 PY.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Issued 13267 Orders to Clear Lake Nutrient TMDL responsible parties for phosphorus load information.
  • Participated in the first year of the Clear Lake Blue Ribbon Committee and helped develop the annual report to the California Legislature.
  • Held a Harmful Algal Bloom (HABs) online workshop geared toward waterbody managers, County Environmental Health and Public Health departments, tribal groups, and other stakeholders that respond to HABs.
  • Completed annual updates to the list of surface waters with Surface Water Quality Management Plans (SQMPs) and their status for Pesticide TMDLs, Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) Pesticide Management Plans, and for the San Joaquin River Selenium TMDL

Priorities 20/21

  • TMDL Implementation
    • Continue assessing phosphorus load allocations in Clear Lake to determine next steps
    • Review semi-annual data submittals, annual monitoring reports, and SQMPs for pesticides and selenium
  • Post-fire Erosion & Sediment Control
    • Oversee Watershed Based Plan for Battle Creek watershed
    • Assess BMP effectiveness associated with Camp Fire recovery projects
  • Water Quality Impacts from Homeless Encampments
    • Evaluate entities in the Stockton area to determine which have responsibility over areas with current homelessness encampments
    • Create an Agency Working Group focused on water quality impairments associated with homelessness encampments in the Stockton area
    • Conduct a water quality assessment of waterbodies that are near identified homelessness encampments in the Fresno area
  • Manage three 319(h) Grants

Administrative Support Program


Overview of the Administrative Support Program

The Regional Board employs approximately 250 permanent employees and 40 temporary or part-time employees. Of those staff, 19 serve as our Administrative Section team. The Administrative Support Program provides administrative support for the management of 18 technical and regulatory programs across three offices (Rancho Cordova, Redding and Fresno).

Our Administrative program staff play a key role in our infrastructure, not only in the day-to-day operations, but also working within the regulatory program areas to ensure that our staffing resources are used efficiently. Our team is responsible for activities that are related to budget projection and tracking, contract/grant development and management, procurement, managing laboratory services, record keeping, billing, personnel/human resources, recruitment, physical distribution of mail/electronic content management, vehicle fleet, data management, and logistics.

Program Goals

The Administrative Support Program serves to support the Region’s mission, initiatives and priorities by providing constant, reliable administrative assistance to our customers, both internally and externally, while applying the highest standards and ethics.

Resources

A total of 19.5 PYs has been allocated between all three office in the Central Valley Region for Fiscal Year 20/21: 4.5 PYs in Fresno, 2.0 in Redding and 12.0 in the Rancho Cordova office.

Administrative Support Program staff in the Rancho Cordova and Fresno offices also provide program-specific support to the following program areas:

  • Irrigated Lands
  • Cleanup
  • TMDLS, Basin Planning, NPS, Delta Section
  • Point Source Permitting
  • NPDES

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Efficiently processed and reconciled over 1,000 employee training requests; ensuring timely course registrations for external training courses and conferences.
  • Developed and implemented a CalATERS claim tracking log and digital upload process reducing redundant manual data entry.
  • Facilitated group and individual training for staff on Web Site Document Accessibility. Assisted technical programs in the production and remediation of over 1,000 web accessible documents.
  • Developed and implemented a new procurement tracking system to ensure the region’s purchase orders are processed efficiently to help expedite the state procurement process.

Priorities 20/21

  • Records Management - Develop and implement a record management plan to assist the Central Valley Water Board’s staff with efficient management methods associated with the maintenance, retention, preservation, and disposal of State records.
  • Equipment Management – Establish an internal tracking system and process to catalog/track equipment inventory in all three offices. and develop procedures/requirements for sending in equipment for maintenance to reduce equipment redundancy and ensure proper equipment safety/maintenance standards.

Special Permitting Programs

Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program


Overview of the Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program

In the Central Valley region, there are over 30,000 irrigated agricultural operations on over 6 million acres of land. The Irrigated Lands Regulatory Program (ILRP) regulates these operations to protect the beneficial uses of surface and groundwater.

Growers who are part of a third-party group (coalitions) are regulated under one commodity-specific and seven geographic General Orders. There are 14 coalitions that assist growers comply with the General Orders. There is also a General Order for growers who choose to be regulated individually.

Coalitions monitor surface and groundwater and develop management plans to address water quality problems, while growers implement practices to protect water quality.

Program Goals

The goal of the ILRP is to prevent discharges from irrigated lands from causing adverse impacts to beneficial uses in surface waters and groundwater through Order implementation, appropriate compliance, outreach, and enforcement, and coordination with all interested parties. This includes working to implement the human right to safe, clean, affordable, and accessible water while also acknowledging the value of a healthy and sustainable irrigated agricultural industry in the Central Valley.

Implementation of the General Orders includes oversight of coalition and grower activities and management of water quality data. Compliance and outreach activities include maximizing grower enrollment and Order compliance. Coordination is facilitated through regular stakeholder meetings and other venues.

Resources

Resources capable of funding 18.3 full-time staff are dedicated to this program and distributed between the three offices of the Central Valley Water Board. About 60% of the resources fund planning, monitoring and implementation activities as well as program management. This includes implementation of the CV-SALTS Basin Plan Amendments and the external expert review of the East San Joaquin Coalition’s surface water monitoring framework. About 40% of the resources fund compliance and outreach activities, which include oversight of the on-farm drinking water well monitoring requirement.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Approval of 51 surface water quality management plan completions, based on water quality data documenting compliance with trigger limits, coalition outreach and grower implementation of management practices.
  • Expansion of the on-farm drinking water well monitoring program to include members from the East San Joaquin Coalition and the seven Tulare Lake Basin coalitions, resulting in over 3,000 wells monitored.
  • Update of the Grassland Bypass Project Waste Discharge Requirements.
  • Initiation of an external expert review of the East San Joaquin Coalition’s surface water monitoring framework and staff evaluations of potential alternative regulatory frameworks for low threat irrigated agricultural activities.
  • Completion of over 20,000 desktop inspections to identify operations that might need coverage with the ILRP.

Priority Projects 20/21

  • CV-SALTS Basin Plan Amendments – The ILRP General Orders will be updated to include requirements of the CV-SALTS Basin Plan Amendments, and staff will work with the agricultural coalitions to implement the requirements.
  • External review of the East San Joaquin Coalition’s surface water monitoring framework – The external review panel will meet again in August 2020 and provide their recommendations to our Board by the end of the year.
  • Development of an alternative ILRP regulatory framework for low-risk commodity types – Initial effort will focus on irrigated pasture in Goose Lake and then expand to the other upper watersheds. Staff is working with UC researchers to expand the use of irrigated pasture-specific templates and to develop a recommendation on regulating the Goose Lake watershed to bring to the December 2020 Board meeting.

Oil Field Program


Overview of the Oil Field Program

Most California oil production occurs in the Central Valley. Formation water produced with the oil, known as produced wastewater, comprises the largest volume of wastes generated by oil production. Produced wastewater is typically saline, and disposed of by land application, primarily ponds, or by underground injection. Some is recycled on crops. Other oil field wastes include drilling muds and solids and sludges generated when tanks and equipment are cleaned.

The Oil Field Program employs 19 staff to regulate produced wastewater disposal and reuse, underground injection control (UIC) practices, and well stimulation practices (SB4) to ensure the protection of water quality.

Program Goals

Oil Field produced wastewater is often high in salts and boron, and can contain significant amounts of organic compounds. Discharges to land have the potential to adversely impact beneficial use waters. Similarly, improperly sited underground injection control wells and stimulated wells have the potential to adversely impact beneficial use waters. The goal of the Oil Field Program is to properly regulate oil field discharges and oversee monitoring activities to ensure the protection of surface and groundwaters and human health. This includes issuing effective regulatory orders for discharges to land and reviewing proposed aquifer exemption applications, UIC permits, and SB4 related groundwater monitoring programs to ensure permitted activities are protective of water quality.

Resources

  • Discharge to Land Activities (Ponds):9.16 PYs
  • UIC Activities: 5 PYs
  • SB4 Activities: 4 PYs

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Issued 30 13260 Orders for dischargers with outdated WDRs to bring them under Oil Field General Orders (GOs).
  • Issued an Administrative Civil Liability to a discharger that failed to comply with a Cleanup and Abatement Order (CAO)
  • Finalized Notices of Applicability for dischargers under CAOs to bring them under the GOs.
  • Approved eight oil field pond closure plans.
  • Issued four closure letters.
  • Inspected 64 facilities.
  • Reviewed six aquifer exemptions.
  • Reviewed 51 UIC projects.
  • Reviewed 74 SB4 applications.
  • Reviewed 42 SB4 groundwater monitoring plans.
  • Facilitated three public meetings and nine conference calls with the Food Safety Expert Panel.
  • Posted to the website the final Food Safety Task 1 report. Reviewed drafts of the Task 2 and 3 reports.

Priorities 20/21

  • Enrolling dischargers under one of the three GOs.
  • Closing inactive ponds in a manner that is protective of water quality.
  • Pursuing appropriate enforcement for oil field-related violations of the Water Code, including, but not limited to, violations WDRs, cleanup orders, and GOs, and spills/leaks and other illicit discharges.
  • Reviewing for enforcement pond facilities that threaten beneficial use waters.
  • Finalizing the Food Safety Expert Panel project.
  • Reviewing aquifer exemptions and proposed UIC projects to ensure the protection of water quality.
  • Reviewing proposed well stimulation applications and groundwater monitoring plans to ensure water quality protection.

Title 27 Land Disposal Program


Overview of the Title 27 Land Disposal Program

The Title 27 Land Disposal Program primarily regulates landfills that receive solid and liquid wastes. These wastes include municipal solid waste (MSW), hazardous wastes, designated wastes (such as petroleum-impacted soils), and nonhazardous and inert solid wastes. In general, these wastes cannot be discharged directly to the ground surface without impacting groundwater or surface water and, therefore, must be contained. The facilities are regulated pursuant to Title 27 (nonhazardous wastes) or Chapter 15 of Title 23 (hazardous wastes). Requirements to contain, monitor and close the disposal sites are implemented through the adoption of Waste Discharge Requirements (WDRs).

Program Goals

The primary goal of the program is to protect groundwater and surface water quality from contaminants associated with landfills, liquid waste surface impoundments and other waste containment units. The program achieves this goal by ensuring WDRs are kept up to date with Title 27 regulations and implementing timely enforcement where necessary.

Resources

A total of 14.26 PYs are allocated to the program, with 6 PYs directed to compliance and enforcement activities and 8.26 to permitting. The scope of work associated with the compliance and enforcement-related resources is contained the Compliance and Enforcement Work Plan.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • 10 individual WDRs adopted
  • Additional dischargers enrolled under the Composting General Order. A total of 25 composting facilities are now enrolled in the General Order.
  • 27 permitting and construction-related inspections were performed
  • Completed the draft final revised Municipal Solid Waste WDR template.
  • Reviewed and approved numerous workplans to monitor for the presence of PFOS and PFOAs in groundwater at facilities.

Priority Projects 20/21

  • Adopt 16 individual WDRs
  • Conduct 28 permitting and construction-related inspections
  • Ensure that composting facilities comply with CV-SALTS requirements
  • Implement Lean 6 Sigma style exercises to improve unit performance
  • Revise the current Program Manual

Confined Animal Facilities Program


Overview of the Confined Animal Facilities Program

The Central Valley is home to a variety of agricultural operations that rely on animals (cows, steers, sheep, goats, pigs, and poultry). Confined Animal Facilities (CAFs) are ranches where livestock are held and provided food for a significant part of the time, as opposed to grazing, where livestock eat forage that grows in pastures or rangeland. Federally defined Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) are a subset of CAFs. (The Board regulates most CAFs under the Water Code, not federal authority; therefore, they are technically not CAFOs.)

Most CAFs in the Central Valley are dairies. There are also a significant number of feedlots (beef cattle and support stock for dairies) and poultry facilities.

Program Goals

The goal of the CAF Program is to ensure the human right to safe, clean, affordable, and accessible water, protect all beneficial uses of water potentially affected by discharges from CAFs, and preserve the benefits of a healthy and sustainable livestock industry. To achieve this, our objective is to protect surface water and groundwater resources by regulating discharges from CAFs.

Discharges from CAFs include manure, wastewater, and storm water runoff that may contain waste constituents. The primary constituents of concern in these discharges are salts and nitrogen (particularly nitrate leaching to groundwater). The permits regulating CAFs typically include requirements for animal housing and corrals, production areas, ponds or lagoons, and land application areas.

Resources

There are 12 staff working full-time in the CAF Program, supplemented by 3 other staff with a percentage of their time dedicated to the Program, for a total of about 14 PYs. Staff are equally divided between the Rancho Cordova and Fresno offices. Staff from the Rancho Cordova office also oversee CAFs in the area normally covered by the Redding office.

Staff generally spend about 70 percent of their time in the course of a year on compliance and enforcement, and about 30 percent on permitting activities. Permitting includes drafting or amending orders and enrolling facilities under general orders.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Continued enrolling bovine feedlots and poultry facilities under their respective general orders.
  • Developed notices to comply with CV-SALTS for dairies, bovine feedlots, and poultry facilities. Developed mailing lists of owners and operators and assisted in issuing approximately 1,500 notices to CAFs for the Nitrate Control Program.
  • Conducted 303 inspections, exceeding the FY2019/2020 performance target of 275.
  • Issued six formal enforcement orders (Administrative Civil Liability and Cease and Desist Orders) for off-property discharges from dairies or for over applying to land application areas.
  • Issued directives to approximately 70 dairies in areas of shallow groundwater that required them to determine if there is separation between the bottoms of the ponds and the highest anticipated level of groundwater.
  • Participated in the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s grant program for dairy digesters and other manure management practices that reduce short-lived climate pollutants and to streamline the permitting of manure digesters and co-digesters. Participated in the planning and permitting of several dairy digester projects.

Priorities 20/21

  • Conduct at least 275 CAF inspections, including dairies, poultry facilities, and feedlots.
  • Plan on revising the existing Dairy General Order in response to direction provided by the State Water Board, which is considering the water quality petition filed requesting review of that Order. Changes to the Dairy General Order are also needed to incorporate additional treatment or control practices, pesticide and surface water monitoring, and provisions to implement CV-SALTS.
  • Prioritize enforcement against unpermitted off-site discharges of waste, as well as enforcement of the requirements for groundwater monitoring and nitrogen management planning at dairies, full-coverage poultry facilities, and full-coverage bovine feedlots.
  • Prioritize compliance with directives to dairies in areas of shallow groundwater to determine separation between pond bottom and highest anticipated level of groundwater, and to follow up with plans to remediate the situation if there is a lack of separation.
  • Conduct outreach and education, and enforcement if necessary, for notices to comply with the CV-SALTS Nitrogen Management Program and develop and issue notices to comply with the Salt Management Program.
  • Continue to participate in the California Department of Food and Agriculture’s grant program to promote digesters and alternative manure management technologies.

Mines Program


Overview of the Mines Program

Central Valley Water Board staff regulate 107 mine sites with known or potential water quality impacts. This is a subset of the 47,000 abandoned mine sites with physical and/or environmental hazards identified throughout California by the Department of Conservation. Most mine sites regulated by the Central Valley Water Board are closed and abandoned mines that have not operated for decades (in many cases, well over 100 years). Discharges of waste from these mine sites can have devastating effects on receiving waters and can significantly limit or obliterate beneficial uses for miles downstream. Primary pollutants from mine sites include low pH and metals such as arsenic, copper, mercury, and zinc.

Program Goals

The Mines Program oversees the discharges of waste from active and inactive mines. Discharges from active mines, or mines that are closing or under post-closure care, are regulated through the issuance of WDRs. The ultimate programmatic goal for inactive mines (including abandoned mines) is to eliminate surface water and groundwater impacts from past mining and prevent further degradation of waters of the State. Mines are regulated primarily by Title 27 of California Code of Regulations, State Water Resources Control Board Resolution Order 92-49, and other laws and regulations for the closure of mine sites and cleanup. Cleanup actions may be facilitated using voluntary agreements, permitting mechanisms or via enforcement orders.

Resources

During FY20/21, a total of 6.9 PYs has been allocated towards Mines Program oversight, of which 5.4 PYs are directed towards permitting, compliance and enforcement.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Staff assessed and inspected 16 mines within the Central Valley Region to assess site conditions and compliance, assist with permit development, and monitor construction activities. Two mines were reclassified as requiring no further action. Additional work is needed to better understand and address water quality impacts associated with two of the mines.
  • Oversaw work by an engineering firm specializing in mines to assess operation and maintenance needs at Walker Mine.
  • Staff updated the Central Valley Water Board’s approach to ranking the water quality threat posed by each mine on the Central Valley Water Board’s list of 107 mines.
  • Three mine sites were enrolled under Order R5-2016-0076-01, Waste Discharge Requirements, Limited Threat Discharges to Surface Water.

Priorities 20/21

  • Assess four more sites classified as having unknown status on the Central Valley Water Board’s list of 107 mines.
  • Conduct 20 site assessment, compliance, permit development and construction inspections.
  • Renew one NPDES permit and one Title 27 WDRs. Conduct work to support NPDES permits and WDRs planned for FY21/22.
  • At Bully Hill/Rising Star Mines, select and begin implementing site hardening projects.
  • At Walker Mine, develop a scope of work and contract for site operation and maintenance needs.
  • Begin applying the Central Valley Water Board’s approach to ranking mines on the Central Valley Water Board’s list of 107 mines.
  • Prepare a strategy for developing a conceptual management plan for abandoned mine discharges.

Cannabis Program


Overview of the Cannabis Program

The Central Valley Water Board’s Cannabis Regulatory Program regulates waste discharges associated with cannabis cultivation and associated ground disturbance activities. The Program is implemented through the statewide Cannabis Cultivation Policy, the statewide General Order for permitting actions, compliance inspections, and targeted enforcement actions against cultivators who fail to comply with permitting requirements. The Cannabis Regulatory Program coordinates heavily with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, state cannabis licensing agencies, local regulatory agencies, and state and local law enforcement agencies.

Program Goals

The Cannabis Regulatory Program focuses on four core objectives:

  • Increase enrollments in the General Order;
  • Perform targeted enforcement in high value watersheds;
  • Continue education and outreach to cultivators;
  • Coordinate with other agencies at the state and local level

Through implementation of these objectives, the Program strives to prevent cultivation activities from negatively impacting water quality. Impacts stem from: erosion and sediment discharge associated with ground disturbing activities including cultivation pads, access roads, and dam construction; use and improper storage of fertilizers, pesticides, and fuels; improper septage disposal, and poor housekeeping. Through implementation of the statewide Cannabis Cultivation Policy and General Order, and the Program’s core objectives and proper best management practices, impacts to water quality can be prevented.

Resources

The Central Valley Water Board’s Cannabis Regulatory Program is currently supported by 7 PYs of technical staff and 2.5 PYs of managerial staff.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

Throughout Fiscal Year 19/20 the Cannabis Regulatory Program was successful in meeting most of its goals and objectives. These include:

  • Enrollment of 212 cultivators under the statewide General Order,
  • 23 outreach events,
  • 114 permit compliance inspections,
  • 49 enforcement inspections
  • Two Administrative Civil Liability Complaints, both of which are currently pending.

Priorities 20/21

The Central Valley Water Board approved seven priority projects for FY 20/21. However, based on the recent reduction in staffing resources, the Cannabis Regulatory Program will narrow its focus to two primary priorities for FY 20/21: enrollment enforcement to encourage enrollment in the General Order and enforcement of sites identified with the most egregious water quality violations in high value watersheds. Given the resource limitations of the program statewide, increasing enrollment is critical to the viability of the program. Focused enforcement is a critical element of the program to discourage non-compliance.

Forest Activities Program


Overview of the Forest Activities Program

Nonpoint source pollution is the leading cause of water quality impairments in California. California’s forested lands produce the highest quality waters and provide the majority of the state’s water. The Forest Activities Program focuses regulatory efforts and grant funding on land use and restoration activities related to historic and current forestland management on both federal and non-federal lands within the Central Valley Region.

Program Goals

The goal of the Central Valley Water Board’s Forest Activities Program is to prevent impacts to surface waters due to discharges of pollutants related to forestland management: sediment, petroleum products, pesticides/herbicides, and other waste materials, in accordance with the state’s 2004 NonPoint Source Implementation Policy. Through regulatory oversight of commercial timber harvesting, fuels management, post-fire salvage and other forestland management activities with the potential to affect waters of the state, the program aims to restore access to habitat for fish, reduce anthropogenic stream channel modifications, and reduce impacts from legacy roads and watercourse crossings.

Staff review individual projects, make site-specific recommendations, and ensure compliance with pertinent regulations and policies through inspections and enforcement.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Conducted 216 inspections where the target was 166. The majority of additional inspections were for post-fire salvage logging subsequent to the many large fires of 2018.
  • Executed and provided technical expertise for 9 grants/contracts aimed at improving forestlands in watersheds where legacy logging impacts exist.
  • Hired and trained 6 new staff to address Forest Practice Rule timber harvest plan exemptions, monitoring of those exemptions, and utility corridor vegetation management activities. Developed a GIS model to identify water quality priority areas where utility activities may occur.
  • Completed a review of best management practices and processes used by the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management to aid in the development of a new permit for nonpoint source discharges.

Priorities 20/21

  • Oversight of timber harvesting activities across federal and non-federal lands for compliance with the Timberland General Order of WDR.
  • Outreach, internal and external coordination will be the focus for the staff hired to address utility corridor vegetation management activities.
  • Federal Nonpoint Source Permit Development
    • Continue collaboration with the Lahontan Water Board on the development of a programmatic permit for the USFS and the BLM.
    • Continue engagement of the Permit Development Group to work through the complexities of applying permit conditions to federal agencies with vast ownership and multi-use mandates.
    • Tribal outreach will be initiated.
    • A contract through DGS is expected to be executed to conduct analysis and prepare an Environmental Impact Report in accordance with CEQA.

Enforcement and Cleanup

Compliance and Enforcement Program


Overview of the Compliance and Enforcement Program

The State Water Resources Control Board and the nine Regional Water Quality Control Boards protect the waters of the state by ensuring compliance with clean water laws and taking enforcement actions when violations occur. The Water Boards have authority under the Water Code to regulate and enforce any activity or factor that may affect the quality of the waters of the state. The Water Boards’ compliance and enforcement actions are guided by the State Water Board’s 5 October 2017 Enforcement Policy.

Program Goals

The Compliance and Enforcement (CE) Program aims to protect water quality, regulate facilities which have the potential to pollute water, and enforce state and federal laws and policies. In order to assess compliance with waste discharge and other requirements, staff document and track violations of the requirements in various databases. Where violations occur, staff are responsible for taking swift and fair enforcement actions. To do this, CE staff must conduct inspections, respond to complaints, identify sites requiring a permit, provide technical and regulatory oversight, issue enforcement actions consistent with the Enforcement Policy to ensure compliance and protection of human health, the environment, and water quality.

Resources

For Region 5, there are 275 employees across all three offices representing 57 PYs working in C/E (14 PYs in Fresno; 12 PYs in Redding; and 31 PYs in Sacramento). These resource allocations do not include the Underground Storage Tank and Site Cleanup Programs.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

  • Inspections – Staff performed 1,528 inspections under the NPDES, WDR, Stormwater, Confined Animal Feeding Operations, Timber Harvest, Site Cleanup, and Underground Storage Tank programs.
  • Enforcement Actions – Staff performed 942 enforcement actions including Notices to Comply, Notices of Violation, Notices of Stormwater Noncompliance, Technical Reports, Cleanup and Abatement Orders, Time Schedule Orders, Cease and Desist Orders, and Administrative Civil Liabilities.
  • Steelhead Creek – Worked in collaboration with the City of Sacramento, Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership, Sacramento Area Sewer District, flood control agencies, and watershed groups to clean up 60 tons of trash and restore the habitat in Steelhead Creek.
  • Web Document Accessibility – Staff developed and implemented web accessible enforcement actions so documents posted on the web are accessible for people with disabilities.

Priorities 20/21

  • Inspections – CE staff are scheduled to perform 1,462 inspections in FY 2020/2021 under the NPDES, WDR, Stormwater, Confined Animal Feeding Operations, Timber Harvest, Site Cleanup, and Underground Storage Tank programs.
  • Permitting and Compliance & Enforcement Communication – Program staff will meet regularly to discuss pre-issue papers prepared by permitting and CE staff for facilities prior to WDR adoption. Direction will be provided by management and the AEO (Executive Sponsor).
  • Compliance with CV-Salts Program – CE staff will track 1000+ facilities’ notice to comply responses, which will be distributed among permitting and C/E staff to review, evaluate, approve, and follow-up.
  • Homelessness – Continue engaging with stakeholders to form groups to tackle water quality related homelessness efforts by working cooperatively, leveraging resources, and coordinating efforts.

Site Cleanup Program


Overview of the Site Cleanup Program

The Site Cleanup Program regulates and oversees the investigation and cleanup of contaminated sites. Staff oversee investigation and cleanup actions at sites that have been impacted by releases of pollutants to soil, soil gas, groundwater, surface water, sediments, and indoor air. Site Cleanup Program sites include large industrial facilities, military bases, oil refineries, factories, and smaller facilities such as dry cleaners and plating shops. Many properties are in urban areas and environmental justice communities and cleanup often results in contaminant removal, reduced impact to water and stimulated economic growth.

The types of pollutants encountered at Site Cleanup Program sites are diverse and include fertilizers, heavy metals, solvents, and many others. Additional information can be found at: https://www.waterboards.ca.gov/water_issues/programs/scp/

Program Goals

The primary mission of the Site Cleanup Program is to protect water quality, regulate practices which have the potential to pollute water, and enforce state and federal laws and policies. To do this, Site Cleanup Program staff must identify contaminated sites, provide technical and regulatory oversight of cleanup activities, and ensure that remedies result in site restoration and protection of human health, the environment and water quality.

Resources

Site Cleanup Program PYs are divided amongst the regulatory oversight of Private, Military, and Department of Energy (D.O.E.) sites. Some sites, such as Aerojet, are very large multifaceted investigation and cleanup sites that require significant staff hours. When fully staffed, approximately 30 PYs oversee remediation efforts of contaminated sites in the Central Valley.

FY 19/20 Accomplishments

Staff provided technical review and regulatory oversight on over 900 site investigation, remediation and remedial design documents. This work has allowed 50 sites to be moved from investigation to active remediation, resulted in closure of 46 sites and removed of over 20 million pounds of contaminated soil, soil gas, free product (gasoline, diesel, solvents, etc.) and contaminated groundwater.

Staff continued efforts to identify sites eligible for grants through the Site Cleanup Subaccount Program and to reduce our site backlog in GeoTracker. Staff work also resulted in the completion of all 750 site reviews and summary memoranda regarding inactive cases in GeoTracker. Staff are now in the process of evaluating 140 cases identified as requiring additional work and have assigned staff to work on 70 of these inactive cases to reduce the backlog cases even further. Staff also continue to improve our Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping tools.

Priority Projects FY 20/21

The Site Cleanup Program will achieve the performance goals contained in our Programmatic Work Plan. In addition, we will continue to focus on the following:

  • Brownfield Projects:
    • Aerojet
    • McClellan Business Park
    • Sacramento Rail Yards
    • Sacramento R Street and S Street Redevelopment
    • Bakersfield Refinery, Kern County
    • Shasta Pulp and Paper Mill, Shasta County
    • Union Pacific Railroad, Dunsmuir facility, Siskiyou County
  • Environmental Measures - SCP staff will track the number of pounds of contamination removed from the environment in 2020 and will develop new measures to demonstrate the impact our work is having on water quality.
  • Emerging Contaminant Issues – SCP will continue to evaluate the groundwater impacts from 1,2,3-Trichloropropane (1,2,3-TCP). SCP will also continue to monitor perfluorinated Chemicals (PFAS) in groundwater in our region based on our 13267 PFAS orders recently sent out to former metal plating facilities, airports, POTWs, and landfills.

Underground Storage Tank (UST) / Above Ground Storage Tank (AGT) Program


Overview of the UST/AGT Program

The Underground Storage Tank (UST) and Aboveground Storage Tank (AST) Program includes: leak prevention, oversight of leaking underground tank cleanups, and reimbursement to responsible parties conducting cleanups. Board staff is primarily involved with the oversight of cleanups. Currently, Board staff is actively directing the cleanup work at approximately 380 leaking underground tank sites. Since inception of the program, over 2,900 UST releases have been investigated, remediated and closed at the direction of the Board.

We also work closely with the State Water Board's Cleanup Fund, which provides funding to responsible parties for investigation and remediation of leaking underground storage tank sites.

Program Goals

The highest priority for the UST Program is to protect the public and environment from the effects of unauthorized releases from UST through the investigation and mitigation of the released constituents. Staff will continue to work with Responsible Parties to close active UST cases in as short of time needed to complete the work. When applicable, we will implement the State’s Low Threat Closure Policy for USTs and concentrate work on the remaining high-threat cases. For all open cases, we have identified the remaining impediments to closure and posted the findings on GeoTracker so they are available for public viewing.

Resources

In Fiscal Year 2020/21 approximately 13.5 PYs of technical staff time and 1.6 PYs of management and support staff will be spent on the UST Program. All technical staff time will be spent managing individual caseloads.

FY 18/19 Accomplishments

  • Moved 24 cases into remediation.
  • Reviewed 100% of our open cases for possible closure (496 cases)
  • Closed 72 Cases

Priority Projects 19/20

  • Review every open case for possible case closure.
  • Ensure that every open case receives at least one case review and written directive/correspondence during the year.
  • Update the Path To Closure fields in GeoTracker for every open case so that all Responsible Parties are aware of the steps remaining for case closure.